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The Greatest Public Speakers of All Time

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Great public speakers don’t just entertain. They inspire people during difficult times and influence individuals of disparate ideas to come together. Since the inception of our nation, great speakers have helped define America’s history and pave the course for the future. Let’s examine the greatest American public speakers of all time from internationally renowned public speaker Lawrence Mitchell.

Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, was one of the best speakers in American history. During the Civil War the fate of the country was at stake, but Lincoln used his profound leadership to piece the nation back together. One of his most famous speeches was The Gettysburg Address, which though it only lasted 2 minutes, continues to have a great impact. The Gettysburg Address is arguably one of the best speeches in American history. Another compelling speech by Lincoln was his Second Inaugural Address. Also short, this speech was just 7 minutes long and spoke of healing and forgiveness.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. was a captivating speaker who was at the forefront of the Civil Rights Movement. His efforts brought Americans of different races together to fight for equal rights for African Americans and an end to racism. His most famous speech, “I Have a Dream”, drew over 200,000 people to the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. Though he was assassinated before seeing the outstanding outcome of his efforts, his legacy lives on and his teachings are still shared today.

John F. Kennedy

John F. Kennedy was the 35th president of the United States. He was also the first Roman Catholic president and the youngest person to be elected president. His speeches mobilized Americans during a period of great uncertainty. Though he only spent about 1,000 days in office before being assassinated, he delivered some of the most memorable speeches of all time. JFK’s most famous line was, “Ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.”